Improve Your Dink Shot: Pickleball 411

How can you improve your dink shot? In this episode of Pickleball 411, you can learn from veteran pickleball player Steve Paranto as he explains the massive improvements you can make to your game if you use the cross-court dink shot instead of dinking straight across to your opponent. Using his own visual aids (as if you are right there with him in class!), Steve lays out the many advantages when using the cross-court dink including how it can give you greater control of your game and improve your skills.  Watch this video now and learn more about the cross-court dink today!

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8 Comments

  1. Thanks Steve for the visual aid on the cross court dink shot. Showing the advantages of the cross court dink helps reinforce the benefits of this critical shot. And a huge shout out to Pickleball channel! Thank you for providing great content on a regular basis. It’s helpful and fun.

  2. Cheryl Jameson says:

    The visual with the extending rod really helped me understand the concept. Thanks for sharing.

  3. Bob Klarich says:

    Another good training video!

  4. Sherlock says:

    Hi ladies and gentlemen,
    I’ve noticed in some of the videos that serving in a continuous upward motion is not always enforced. Isn’t it true that in this game that the service should not be so offensive and aggressive, but rather a means to getting the point started. Can you create a video showing the difference between an illegal serve for an ace with side spin and lots of pace,and one that is proper and within the guidelines of proper serving. Thanks

  5. John Del Masto says:

    Very good lesson. Raised my pickleball consciousness a bit. Thanks. John

  6. Arun s says:

    Yes using a fishing pole for example is an idea I’ve been employing before teaching drills. You are using something akin to a slow motion or freeze frame parabola of the flight or trajectory of the ball. Once they chase the ball down as you move it they are more easily able to do several of these dinks during the drills.
    I also use it on several other areas e.g. the overheads, be it a smash, controlled drop or a return surprise lob of your own. Generally most lobbers are expecting a downward shot from the overhead. Yet and but, if you sometimes decide to lob or do an overhead soft lob in answer to their lob, then you are able to throw the opponent off balance. By its nature it’s unpredictable since they’re used to expecting a smash or downward shot if not a volley.

  7. Arun s says:

    Yes using a fishing pole for example is an idea I’ve been employing before teaching drills. How better to use the many holes in a Pickleball ball since they are otherwise there only to watch how much spin may be on them. You are using something akin to a slow motion or freeze frame parabola of the flight or trajectory of the ball. Once they chase the ball down as you move it around, they are more easily able to do several of these dinks during the drills. Footwork is also enhanced but careful not to twist an ankle. Ouch!
    I also use it on several other areas e.g. the overheads, be it a smash, controlled drop or a return surprise lob of your own. Generally most lobbers are expecting a downward shot from the overhead. Yet and but, if you sometimes decide to lob or do an overhead soft lob in answer to their lob, then you are able to throw the opponent off balance. By its nature it’s unpredictable since they’re used to expecting a smash or downward shot if not a volley. I love when I get away with it, but I’m cautious not to overuse it. Only as a change up or it loses value.

  8. Arun s says:

    Yes using a fishing pole for example is an idea I’ve been employing before teaching drills. How better to use the many holes in a Pickleball ball since they are otherwise there only to watch how much spin may be on them. You are using something akin to a slow motion or freeze frame parabola of the flight or trajectory of the ball. Once they chase the ball down as you move it around, they are more easily able to do several of these dinks during the drills. Footwork is also enhanced but careful not to twist an ankle. Ouch!
    I also use it on several other areas e.g. the overheads, be it a smash, controlled drop or a return surprise lob of your own. Generally most lobbers are expecting a downward shot from the overhead. Yet and but, if you sometimes decide to lob or do an overhead soft lob in answer to their lob, then you are able to throw the opponent off balance. By its nature it’s unpredictable since they’re used to expecting a smash or downward shot if not a volley. I love when I get away with it, but I’m cautious not to overuse it. Only as a change up or it loses value.
    Another prop is a rope or bungee cord swung predictable and unpredictably at net to improve volleys. It can be swung in circles or straight up or down to improve volley skills.

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